TheMauveRoom
The Illustrated London News: Sept. 21, 1918
Left: The grand duchesses and their mother, 1916
Right: 1914 Formal of the grand duchesses

Although the Soviet government took pains to spread misinformation regarding the fate of the tsar’s family after the assassination, people around the world already suspected what had really happened. Lenin’s government in Moscow was on shaky ground at the time of the Romanov murders and did not want to be seen as the murderers of innocent women and children. Some of the rumors concerning the survival of some or all of the Romanov women were actually started by the government to hide what they had done. They may have even gone as far as to install a group of five women in a house in Perm, where some believed the tsar’s wife and daughters had been taken, and force them to pose as the Imperial women. The average Russian peasant would have been unlikely to have ever seen the tsar’s family, so it would have been relatively easy to convince them that they had “seen the grand duchesses alive” in Perm. On the other hand, many of the executioners were quite open about the fact that the entire family was dead. This marked disparity in testimony caused just enough confusion so that most Russians were genuinely unsure of what had happened to the Romanovs. 
Source: The File on the Tsar by Summers and Mangold
(note: this book is extremely outdated as far as the information about what we now KNOW really happened to the Romanovs, but it does include some interesting information like the deliberate spread of confusion after the murders by the government and some of the evidence from the Sokolov Report.) 

The Illustrated London News: Sept. 21, 1918

Left: The grand duchesses and their mother, 1916

Right: 1914 Formal of the grand duchesses

Although the Soviet government took pains to spread misinformation regarding the fate of the tsar’s family after the assassination, people around the world already suspected what had really happened. Lenin’s government in Moscow was on shaky ground at the time of the Romanov murders and did not want to be seen as the murderers of innocent women and children. Some of the rumors concerning the survival of some or all of the Romanov women were actually started by the government to hide what they had done. They may have even gone as far as to install a group of five women in a house in Perm, where some believed the tsar’s wife and daughters had been taken, and force them to pose as the Imperial women. The average Russian peasant would have been unlikely to have ever seen the tsar’s family, so it would have been relatively easy to convince them that they had “seen the grand duchesses alive” in Perm. On the other hand, many of the executioners were quite open about the fact that the entire family was dead. This marked disparity in testimony caused just enough confusion so that most Russians were genuinely unsure of what had happened to the Romanovs. 

Source: The File on the Tsar by Summers and Mangold

(note: this book is extremely outdated as far as the information about what we now KNOW really happened to the Romanovs, but it does include some interesting information like the deliberate spread of confusion after the murders by the government and some of the evidence from the Sokolov Report.) 

Alexandra Feodorovna in the Mauve Room: 1897. 

Alexandra Feodorovna in the Mauve Room: 1897. 

The Grand Duchesses on a walk with their parents: 1903. 

The Grand Duchesses on a walk with their parents: 1903. 

Grand Duchess Olga on a boat ride along the Dnieper and with her parents the same day: 1916

Grand Duchesses Olga, Anastasia and Maria with their parents and Aunt Olga Alexandrovna: Aboard the Standart, 1908. 

Grand Duchesses Olga, Anastasia and Maria with their parents and Aunt Olga Alexandrovna: Aboard the Standart, 1908. 

The executioner Ermakov at the site of the Romanov burial in Pig’s Meadow: 1920. This photograph was used to help researchers find the remains of the Imperial family. 

The same site today with the Monastery of the Holy Tsarist Passion Bearers, built in 2001. 

The Grand Duchesses on a walk with their parents in the Crimea: 1914

Two newly discovered captivity photos! 

Nicholas at Tsarskoe Selo :1917

Nicholas and Alexandra on the balcony in Tobolsk: September 1917

A close-up of Alexandra Feodorovna embroidering in her wheelchair during the captivity at Tsarskoe Selo in 1917 and the entire page from Anna Vyrubova’s last album including the same photo in addition to the Tsar and Grand Duchesses working in their vegetable garden, Alexei working with a nurse, and the improvised altar the family set up at the Governor’s House in Tobolsk. These photographs must have been among those that were smuggled to Anna Vyrubova from the Tsaritsa while in captivity. 

The Imperial Family boating, 1912. 
From left: Grand Duchesses Maria, Tatiana, Anastasia, and Olga, the Tsaritsa, Tsar, and Tsarevitch. 

The Imperial Family boating, 1912. 

From left: Grand Duchesses Maria, Tatiana, Anastasia, and Olga, the Tsaritsa, Tsar, and Tsarevitch.